Reference Number: 
CTAS-1492

"Back assessment" means the assessment of property, including land or improvements not identified or included in the valuation of the property, which has been omitted from or totally escaped taxation.1"Reassessment" means the assessment of property which has been assessed at less than its actual cash value by reason of connivance, fraud, deception, misrepresentation, misstatement, or omission of the property owner or his/her agent.2

"Connivance" means some conscious conduct by the taxpayer, similar to but short of actual fraud, which caused or induced the low assessment. However, where property has been assessed below its actual cash value by the regularly constituted assessing authorities, failure of the taxpayer to report the underassessment even though grossly underassessed does not constitute connivance nor afford a basis for reassessment. If the taxpayer simply acquiesces in the underassessment by paying the low amount and failing to report it, the taxpayer’s actions do not constitute fraud.3Moreover, when property has been properly listed and has not been omitted from assessment, there can be no back assessment, unless frauds of the nature indicated in T.C.A. § 67-1-1002(a)(2) and (3) is shown. Furthermore, the presumption of fraud, declared by the statute to arise from a grossly inadequate assessment, is not conclusive, but rebuttable.4Failure of the property owner to obtain a required building permit or to file a required written report would be grounds for reassessment, if such failure caused the property to be underassessed.5

A back assessment or reassessment must be initiated on or before September 1 of the year following the tax year for which the original assessment was made.6However, if the omission or underassessment resulted from the failure of the taxpayer to file the reporting schedule required by law, from actual fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation of the property owner or the property owner's agent, or from collusion between the property owner or the property owner's agent and the assessor, a back assessment or reassessment must be initiated prior to three years from September 1 of the tax year for which the original assessment was made.7

With respect to tangible personal property, if a taxpayer would be liable for additional tax due to back assessment of property omitted from a reporting schedule, or due to reassessment of property included in the schedule, the taxpayer may offset this liability by showing that other property listed on the schedule was over reported, or by providing information that the reassessed property or other property listed on the schedule should be valued using a nonstandard method that more closely approximates fair market value.8

Additional taxes due as the result of a back assessment or reassessment shall not be deemed delinquent until 60 days after the date notice of taxes resulting from the back assessment or reassessment is sent to the taxpayer. However, if the back assessment or reassessment resulted from the failure of the taxpayer to file the reporting schedule required by law, from actual fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation of the property owner or the property owner's agent, or from collusion between the property owner or the property owner's agent and the assessor, the additional taxes shall become delinquent as of the date of delinquency of the original assessment.9

A back assessment or reassessment may be initiated by certification of the assessor of property to the appropriate collecting officials identifying the property and stating the basis of the back assessment or reassessment and the tax year(s) and amount of any additional assessment for which the owner or taxpayer is responsible. The assessor shall send a copy of the certification to the owner or taxpayer. The collecting official shall thereupon send a notice of taxes due based on the back assessment and reassessment. Any taxpayer aggrieved by a back assessment or reassessment may appeal directly to the State Board of Equalization within 60 days from the date that a copy of the certification is sent to the taxpayer, in the manner provided in T.C.A. § 67-5-1412, and such person may be assisted or represented in the appeal as provided in T.C.A. § 67-5-1514. The accrual of delinquency penalty and interest otherwise applicable is suspended while the appeal is pending, however, simple interest will accrue during the appeal period in the amount provided in T.C.A. § 67-5-1512.10

A back assessment or reassessment for merchants' taxes and delinquent privilege taxes may be initiated by a chief administrative officer of a tax jurisdiction to which the tax is payable, any citizen of such jurisdiction, or by the department of revenue. The back assessment or reassessment shall be initiated by the filing of a sworn, written complaint to the county clerk stating the basis of the complaint. The county clerk may require a complainant, other than a public official acting in the official's capacity, to post a reasonable bond for payment of costs of the proceeding if the back assessment or reassessment is unsuccessful. An aggrieved party may appeal the clerk's disposition of the complaint to the department of revenue.11

Those officials having the power to back assess or reassess property are vested with full authority to administer oaths, send for and examine witnesses, and take such steps as may be deemed necessary or material to obtain information and evidence as to the value of the property.12Witnesses, when properly summoned, are subject to existing laws for non-attendance or failure to give evidence which is in their knowledge.13

If the back assessment or reassessment is upheld, the costs of the proceeding are added to the amount of taxes owed. If the back assessment or reassessment is set aside, the taxing jurisdiction must pay costs. However, if the board determines the complaint was filed or prosecuted by the complainant without good cause, then the complainant pays the cost. If the board finds connivance, fraud, deception, misrepresentation, or failure to file a personal property schedule, it may impose a penalty of up to 15 percent of the tax due.14

Innocent purchasers are protected from a reassessment of inadequately assessed real property by a bona fide sale, although this provision does not apply to a back assessment of property that has wholly escaped taxation. The taxes are a liability against the person owning the real property at the time of the inadequate assessment. The burden of proving a bona fide sale is on the person owning the real property at the time of back assessment or reassessment.15


     1T.C.A. § 67-1-1001(a)(1).

     2T.C.A. § 67-1-1001(a)(2).

     3Garner v. Rhea Realty Corp., 494 S.W.2d 783, 787 (Tenn.Ct.App. 1971).

     4Eastland v. Sneed, 185 S.W. 717, 718 (Tenn. 1916).

     5Op. Tenn. Atty. Gen. 87-32 (Mar. 6, 1987).

     61T.C.A. § 67-1-1005(a).

     7T.C.A. § 67-1-1005(a).

     8T.C.A. § 67-5-902(b).

     9T.C.A. § 67-1-1005(a).  For prior law, see Op. Tenn. Atty. Gen. 86-136 (August 8, 1986).

     10T.C.A. § 67-1-1005(b).

     11T.C.A. § 67-1-1005(c).

     12T.C.A. §§ 67-1-1006(a), 67-5-1404.

     13T.C.A. §§ 67-1-1006(b), 67-5-1404.

     14T.C.A. § 67-1-1008.

     15T.C.A. § 67-1-1004.