Capital leases are another avenue in which a county can acquire a capital asset. This avenue is generally the least used and often the most expensive means of financing. Generally speaking, a county can issue capital outlay notes and purchase an asset, as opposed to the leasing of the asset.  Interest rates are often higher in lease contracts than a county can receive via inter-fund loan or capital outlay notes issued to a local financial institution. A county should fully understand the cost of the asset and borrow cost imputed, as well as, whether they intend to use the asset through the end of it useful life. The county should also conduct an analysis of purchase versus lease cost. The Comptroller of the Treasury Division of Local Finance “Guide for the Issuance of Notes by the Counties, Consolidated Governments and Municipalities of Tennessee” set out various requirements for a county to enter into a lease agreement.